These 7 Practices Will Make You a Better Writer

Every writer has a certain methodology (or lack of) when it comes to their writing practice. I used to be of the David Foster Wallace variety— the kind with no specific writing practice. I only wrote when the urge hit. I realized this wasn’t going to sustain a long-time career, and my writing practice has recently become more regimented. I now write daily. I’ve not come to the point where I set a word count for the day or a specific time frame under which to work, but I do write daily.

Continue reading “These 7 Practices Will Make You a Better Writer”

World Press Freedom Day: We Remember Fallen Journalists and Their Oath to Truth

 

Today, May 3, 2016, is the day we celebrate the right to freedom of press. Since I can remember, I’ve wanted to write for a living. When I was younger, I didn’t know what kind of writing I wanted to do. I thought fiction. Maybe poetry. When in college, I had to fill a few of my electives with some writing courses as obligated by the requirements of my degree. I chose journalism as one of those classes, and my life changed.

Continue reading “World Press Freedom Day: We Remember Fallen Journalists and Their Oath to Truth”

Book Review: Lone Star

Lone Star coverAbout Lone Star

• Paperback: 640 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (November 24, 2015)

Falling in love was the easy part . . .

Chloe and her three best friends are weeks away from finishing high school and beginning their new grown-up lives apart from one another. They have been friends since they were kids, their families and lives intertwined, but this is their last summer together. They plan a magical trip to sun-drenched Barcelona, with its possibility of adventure and passion. But first, Chloe has an old family promise to keep, and the four of them must detour through historic Eastern Europe. Continue reading “Book Review: Lone Star”

On Writing Crap (aka the First Draft)

I want to open a dialogue about an idea that is both taboo and yet, spoken about over and over again in the writing community. It’s something every writer deals with. It’s something every writer fears and every reader loathes. 

Writing crap.

Everyone does it. The most prolific of writers write crap. The most famous writers write crap. Continue reading “On Writing Crap (aka the First Draft)”

Must-Subscribe-To Podcasts for Readers & Writers

Readers and writers, connect with your tribe! These podcasts are either on the subjects of reading and writing or hosted by writers!  Continue reading “Must-Subscribe-To Podcasts for Readers & Writers”

Book Review: When the Moon is Low

When The Moon Is LowAbout When the Moon is Low

• Hardcover: 400 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow (July 21, 2015)

By turns astonishing, frightening, and triumphant, When the Moon Is Low chronicles one brave Afghan woman’s odyssey to save her family

In Kabul, we meet Fereiba, a schoolteacher who puts her troubled childhood behind her when she finds love in an arranged marriage. But Fereiba’s comfortable life implodes when the Taliban rises to power and her family becomes a target of the new fundamentalist regime. Forced to flee with her three children, Fereiba has one hope for survival: to seek refuge with her sister’s family in London. Continue reading “Book Review: When the Moon is Low”

Book Review: The Invisibles (with giveaway!)

The Invisibles (430x648)About The Invisibles

• Paperback: 400 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (August 4, 2015)

We’ll choose to remain invisible. To everyone except each other . . . ”

Brought together by chance as teenagers at Turning Winds, a home for girls, Nora, Ozzie, Monica, and Grace quickly bond over their troubled pasts and form their own family, which they dub The Invisibles. With a fierce loyalty to each other, the girls feel that they can overcome any obstacle thrown their way. Though the walls they’ve built around themselves to keep out the rest of the world are thick, they discover one night, when tragedy strikes, that there are cracks in their tight-knit circle. Continue reading “Book Review: The Invisibles (with giveaway!)”

Book Review: The Sunrise

 

The Sunrise (430x648)About The Sunrise

• Paperback: 352 pages
• Publisher: Harper Paperbacks (July 7, 2015)

Internationally bestselling author Victoria Hislop delivers a stirring novel set during the 1974 Cypriot coup d’état that tells the intersecting stories of three families devastated by the conflict. . .

Summer 1972—Famagusta is Cyprus’s most desirable tourist destination in the Mediterranean. Aphroditi Papacostas and her husband, Savvas, own The Sunrise, a wildly successful new luxury hotel. Frequented by only the very wealthiest of Europe’s elite, The Sunrise quickly becomes the place to see and be seen. Yet beneath the veneer of tranquil opulence simmers mounting hostility between the Greek and Turkish Cypriots. Years of unrest and ethnic violence come to a head when, in 1974, Greece’s coup d’état provokes a Turkish attack on beautiful Famagusta. Continue reading “Book Review: The Sunrise”

Book Review: Olivay

OlivayAbout Olivay

 Paperback: 272 pages
• Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (July 7, 2015)

We don’t believe that our lives can change in an instant—until they do.

Olivay, widowed for a year and sleepwalking through life, meets Henry by chance. She takes him to her Los Angeles loft, thinking it will just be for the night. But the following morning, bombs detonate across the city; mayhem and carnage fill the streets; and her loft is covered in broken glass and her own blood. Henry is skittish, solicitous, and strangely distracted. Who is this man she’s marooned with as the city goes on lockdown? Why is she catching him in lie after lie? Is he somehow connected to her husband’s death and the terrorist attacks outside? Continue reading “Book Review: Olivay”

10 ways to spot an undercover book nerd

Before I was comfortable sharing my book nerdiness with the world, I did my best to blend in with my less-than-literary surroundings. My “best” wasn’t all that great though. Even though my mom was aware that reading had been soothing my nerves and stimulating my mind since I was a toddler, the outside world had no idea. I spent much of my teenage years hiding my love of books. When everyone else was scoffing at the language and length of The Scarlet Letter, I was scoffing with them. Only I’d go home and pull out my copy of The Scarlet Letter and read it with a goofy grin on my face, underlining all my favorite old English phrases.  Continue reading “10 ways to spot an undercover book nerd”